Monday, May 22, 2017

Tyrrell Errata

Earthy Tyrrell coffee cups on the seconds shelf

Oops! I misspelled Al Tyrrell's name and, hence, web address. My apologies to the talented potter and to you. It would be www.altyrrellpottery.com to see more.

Sunday, May 21, 2017

Al Tyrell's Cups


I have one of Al Tyrrell’s coffee cups for every day of the week. I’m a big fan of hand thrown pottery, generally, and Al’s lighter than air tazzas fit my thumb and index finger like a glove. I choose the color and shape of the morning’s cup based on a feeling, like selecting what to wear on a given day. Today's is my newest from last Sunday, a lovely granite and burnt sienna number.

The cups shown above reside on Al’s seconds shelf outside opposite his kiln. Damned if I can tell why they're seconds which is not to suggest that I buy seconds. Anyway, I‘ve used a shallow depth of field because I like the softness and how the image fades into the background.

Al says “Dishes in natural colors created to bring beauty to everyday life.” Visit his studio in Dixon, New Mexico or at www.altyrrellpottery.com.

Yeah, I know. With all this talk about colors this probably ought to be in, well, color but black and white's my thing. 

Sunday, May 14, 2017

On the way in the rain


On the way from Malaga to Gaucin by the way of Ronda I passed through a rainstorm and came upon this crumbling finca just as the deluge stopped.

Sunday, May 07, 2017

Leave your mark on the world


Last week’s post was a quiet little effort, almost a throwaway it seemed. But then came comments that told me that the graffiti on the walls of the church in Taiban, NM was thought provoking to some. I told my friend, the noted painter Steven Day, that I didn't know whether the sobering verse ending with "I had to kill myself" was genuinely moving or simply maudlin.

I've learned that the church was built at the cost of $250 in 1908 in the town of Taiban, NM and that it served a congregation of Presbyterians, Methodists and Baptists till 1936 when the town withered to nothingness and vanished entirely by World War Two.                     

Sunday, April 30, 2017

Sometimes it pays to pull over on the side of the road if your curiosity is piqued



Inside the abandoned Presbyterian church between Taiban and Tolar, New Mexico is a range of earthly writings. Some like exhibit one above are exuberantly positive. Others like exhibit two are as dark as dark can be. 

Several years back I re-visited Fort Ord, the long closed army base where I partook of basic training in the summer of 1960. There, too, I came across wrenching graffiti in the barren halls where young men laughed and learned to be soldiers. As best I could figure, squatters had bedded down in the decaying barracks and left us mementos of their angst and desperation. 

My examination of the little church's interior walls affected me the same way.

I applaud the message of the headline I purloined from the south facing wall.

Sunday, April 23, 2017

Vantage Points



The little church between Taiban and Tolar grabbed me and won't let go. Here's the little treasure from the west and and directly up to the eaves.


I’m experimenting with file size as I try to solve the riddle of Facebook’s annoying crops. Facebook viewers please click on the image to be sure you see the whole thing.

Next week a little of what’s written inside the proud edifice.

Sunday, April 16, 2017

Church and Sky


East of Fort Sumner, best known as the place where Pat Garrett plugged Billy the Kid, spread empty flats that are indistinguishable from arid West Texas. Ahead lies Clovis, NM where Buddy Holly recorded his early hits. The ribbon of US Highway 84 slices through the arid steppes with only the remains of tiny railroad towns like Taiban and Tolar to relieve the sameness. Standing alone between them is a shuttered Presbyterian church begging to be remembered.