Sunday, July 05, 2015

Downright Upright

There’s been considerable discussion around here about the days of film and chemicals in dark confined spaces and I’m not talking about adults only theaters. It’s just that some of us of a certain age are getting all misty about those eight hour bouts with a single negative and how that process must have rendered a superior image.

Then again the transition from celluloid to pixels hasn’t been all that damnable looking back.

Here are some shots that track that evolution and that, I submit, make the switch downright upright according to me.

From my 1941 8x10 Kodak 2D using a 4x5 back almost 45 years ago

With the 5MP Nikon Coolpix 5000 in maybe 1999

And the 10MP Canon 1Ds that cost me $7,700.
This one's from the same 10MP unit with a 48" softbox and lens 15" away from Mizahn's face

In the village of  Monieux with the 21MP Canon 5D Mkll










1 comment:

Daryl Black said...

These images are wonderful examples of your photographic history. I, too, sometimes wax poetic about my days in the dark room, the smell of the chemicals, and as you said, making that perfect print. But because of the sensor size increase in modern digital cameras, and the amazing fine art papers and inks being produced, those of us who do not have dark rooms or speedy access to one, can come really close to those days of yore. The image with your Coolpix, of Mizhan's face, and the gent in France equal many of mine that came out of the fix. A great posting, Steve!